Harrison Middleton University
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Tag: Discussion

We’re excited that you’ve joined the conversation! At HMU, we want to continue the great authors’ conversations in a contemporary context, and this blog will help us do that. We look back to Aristotle and the early philosophers who used reason and discourse to gain wisdom and now we endeavor to do the same every day.

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August 18, 2023

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

Harrison Middleton University hosts regularly scheduled discussions for the public as well as students. Open to anyone interested in intellectual discussion, short, easily digestible readings are provided electronically. If you’re interested in more information, reach me at as****@hm*.edu.

Our most recent Quarterly Discussion focused on Thomas Nagel’s article “What Is It Like to Be a Bat?” and the first section of David Hume’s Treatise on Human Nature.

 » Read more about: Nagel and Hume on Consciousness  »

July 28, 2023

Thanks to Dave Seng, HMU alumnus, for today’s post.

To read the previous post in this series, visit hmu.edu

In our last post we looked at the importance of questions and why self-reflection as individuals and a society is important. It seems part of the human situation to ask questions in order to better understand who we are and how to navigate the world. In our discussion series,

 » Read more about: Can AI Have Human Rationality?  »

July 21, 2023

Thanks to HMU Alumnus, Dave Seng, for today’s blog post.

I recently participated in the fall discussion series, What the Greeks can Teach us About AI.  The series focused on four Greek plays — Prometheus Bound by Aeschylus; and Herakles, The Bacchae, and Medea by Euripides.  The discussions were insightful and explored many fascinating questions related to the human condition and societal concerns centering around technology and artificial intelligence (AI). 

 » Read more about: Can AI Help Us With Important Human Questions?  »

July 14, 2023

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

Following our discussion series “What the Greeks Can Teach Us About AI,” I have become increasingly interested in understanding the uses and reasons for using artificial intelligence (AI). Throughout the series, participants repeated the notion that AI was simply a tool. While I believe this is true, I keep returning to the question: what is AI a tool for?

 » Read more about: A Different Sort of Tool  »

Conference Microphone

This year I presented unfinished work on purpose at a recent conference. I have seen people do this. It always seemed so brave and intimidating that I continually shied away…until this year. I have to be honest, rather than terrifying, it was extremely liberating. I began my presentation with the caveat that I was looking for advice and ideas. Unfortunately, our session ran long which cut short the Q and A portion. Yet, in the time that we had,

 » Read more about: Conference Feedback  »

March 31, 2023

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

This year I presented unfinished work on purpose at a recent conference. I have seen people do this. It always seemed so brave and intimidating that I continually shied away…until this year. I have to be honest, rather than terrifying, it was extremely liberating. I began my presentation with the caveat that I was looking for advice and ideas.

 » Read more about: Conference Feedback  »

March 17, 2023

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

“[P]erhaps art is not, we might speculate, in the product itself, nor necessarily in the process, but in the impulse.” – Brian Christian from The Most Human Human

HMU recently wrapped up the Winter Film Series, which focused on the great idea of art. Discussions centered around three films: Black Swan (2010,

 » Read more about: HMU Film Series  »

October 21, 2022

Thanks to Peter Ponzio, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

The Great Books Council of San Francisco held their annual Long Novel Weekend over October 1st and 2nd, with A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens as the chosen novel for 2022. The Council recommended the Penguin Classics edition of the novel, so that participants could follow along when discussing passages from the text.

 » Read more about: Long Novel Weekend  »

October 14, 2022

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

What does it mean to be “literate”? Does literate imply any act of understanding or, even more, of critical thinking, or does it simply mean that one can read physical text?

In How to Read a Book, Mortimer Adler differentiates between elementary, intermediate and advanced levels of reading. Adler explains that good readers read with concentration.

 » Read more about: Pondering the Questions  »

September 16, 2022

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

Recently, I attended a pop-up conference hosted by Classical Pursuits. Moderator Melanie Blake walked us through a short story by Guy de Maupassant. I jumped on this opportunity since I had never read any of his short stories. And discussion is an excellent way to be introduced to new stories! Being in such a large group limited the number of comments from each participants,

 » Read more about: De Maupassant’s “The Necklace”  »

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