Harrison Middleton University
The Raven
Gertrude Stein
astronomical clock
Rachel Carson

Tag: Environment

We’re excited that you’ve joined the conversation! At HMU, we want to continue the great authors’ conversations in a contemporary context, and this blog will help us do that. We look back to Aristotle and the early philosophers who used reason and discourse to gain wisdom and now we endeavor to do the same every day.

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January 14, 2022

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

Though I do not excel at problem solving, I always like to know that someone has a plan. I like the security of emergency plans in hotels, for example. In the outdoors, I have first-aid supplies for all sorts of possibilities. And I never leave home without water and gear to change a tire. So while recently reading Bill Gates’s book How to Avoid a Climate Disaster: The Solutions We Have and The Breakthroughs We Need,

 » Read more about: Book Review: How to Avoid a Climate Disaster  »

Thanks to Dylan O’Hara, a 2020 HMU Fellow in Ideas, for today’s post.

May 22, 2020

Some of the research that has inspired me the most over the last two years or so has been Urban History. The academic crossover between History, Anthropology, Political Science, Cartography, Geography, and Environmental Studies suddenly opened up a whole new world of exploration for me. I was excited to find it was creative, expressive, expansive,

 » Read more about: A Study in Urban History  »

October 18, 2019

Thanks to Jennifer Taylor, a 2019 Harrison Middleton University Fellow in Ideas recipient, for today’s post.

Harari, Yuval N. Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind. [Toronto]: Signal, 2014.

I have often heard that if we choose not to learn from the mistakes of history, we will inevitably end up repeating them. Though it is undeniably very practical advice to be aware of the perils and pitfalls to which we as human beings are susceptible,

 » Read more about: BOOK REVIEW: Sapiens  »

November 3, 2017

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

In celebration of fall color, today’s blog offers excerpts from both Rachel Carson and Aldo Leopold. Both passages celebrate life, love and the mystery of nature. They also ask deep questions about the human place within nature. Changing colors and seasons present the perfect time for reflection. Enjoy – and happy fall!

Photo credit: Alissa Simon

Photo credit: Alissa Simon

From Under the Sea-Wind by Rachel Carson,

 » Read more

March 31, 2017

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

“The word saguaro originated in Ópata, a language spoken by peoples of the Sonoran Desert region of Mexico. It came into English by way of the Spanish spoken by the Mexican settlers of the American West. The very saguaros we see today may well have been around when the word was first noted, some 150 years ago –

 » Read more about: A Saguaro Stands Tall  »

December 2, 2016

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

Does a single word contain a saturation point? In other words, at some point, does a word begin to lose meaning simply because it has accumulated too many definitions? Translation can be a tricky business when we understand that a simple word can carry the weight of a contemporaneous discussion. For example, today’s blog leads us through a few examples of the evolution of the word “green”.

 » Read more about: Saturating Green  »

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