Harrison Middleton University
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Tag: Fellow

We’re excited that you’ve joined the conversation! At HMU, we want to continue the great authors’ conversations in a contemporary context, and this blog will help us do that. We look back to Aristotle and the early philosophers who used reason and discourse to gain wisdom and now we endeavor to do the same every day.

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May 3, 2024

Thanks to John M. Wiley, a 2024 Fellow in Ideas, for today’s book review.

We often hear about whether someone is “left-brained” or “right-brained” to distinguish between one’s predisposition to either logical thinking or creativity. Perhaps many (if not most) people tend to favor one side, but the case of Isaac Watts shows a man who excelled in both sides of his brain. Watts was most often known for his work as the “father of English hymnody,” showing his brilliance as a wordsmith with hymns such as “Alas!

 » Read more about: BOOK REVIEW: Logic by Isaac Watts  »

April 26, 2024

Thanks to Tyler Wright, a 2024 HMU Fellow in Ideas, for today’s review.

A recurrent theme in Mary Q. Steele’s Journey Outside is this idea of rejecting comfort and refuge in the familiar and instead turning one’s attention to the unknown.  Where other tales within the “hollow earth” subgenre present clear external threats that the protagonist must contend with, Dilar’s conflict resides strictly within himself. 

 » Read more about: BOOK REVIEW: Journey Outside by Mary Q. Steele  »

November 17, 2023

Thanks to Chad Greene, a 2023 Fellowship in Ideas recipient, for today’s blog. 

            Of the classes I teach at my community college, the closest to a Great Books class is a course called “Masterpieces of World Literature” that the English department offers every fall. In this class I ask students to apply frameworks of shared inquiry that I have learned from taking Great Books classes for my professional development to our readings of classics such as the Epic of Gilgamesh of Sîn-lēqi-unninni,

 » Read more about: Classics and Comics: Ancient Content – and Advice – in a Modern Form  »

Thanks to Aaron Ducksworth, a 2023 Fellow in Ideas, for today’s post.

November 10, 2023

Many movies of various genres have been made about the relationship between humans and anthropomorphic technology and the complicated relationship between them – think The Terminator franchise (1984-2019), I, Robot (2004), Virtuosity (1995), and The Matrix franchise (1999-2021). M3GAN is different! Not because it attempts to bridge the gap between horror and science fiction through an AI-based film,

 » Read more about: FILM REVIEW: Philosophical Roots in Tech-Horror  »

October 13, 2023

Thanks to Ally Zlatar, a 2023 Fellow in Ideas, for today’s post.

My journey into the realm of art activism was ignited by my personal battle with severe ill health, which included a protracted struggle with an eating disorder spanning over a decade. Throughout my recovery journey, I came to realize that many, particularly within the medical profession, often fixated on the diagnosis rather than recognizing the person grappling with the illness.

 » Read more about: Ally Zlatar: Navigating the Intersection of Art and Activism  »

June 9, 2023

Thanks to Chad Greene, a 2023 Fellow in Ideas recipient, for today’s blog.

Depending on your concentrations, perhaps you have read enough about probability and statistics to dissuade you from playing the types of lotteries states tend to sponsor, such as MegaMillions or Powerball. But, in my own reading of one of the Great Books this spring, I have discovered a delightful lottery that I encourage all lovers of epic poetry to try out.

 » Read more about: Have a Difficult Decision to Make? Have a Copy of Virgil or Homer Handy?  »

May 12, 2023

Thanks to Ally Zlatar, a 2023 Fellow in Ideas, for today’s post.

Emil Cioran’s The Trouble with Being Born is a collection of philosophical essays that takes the reader on a journey into the darkest depths of human existence. The book is a masterpiece of alternative writing style, which is a refreshing break from the dry, academic tone that dominates much of contemporary philosophy.

 » Read more about: BOOK REVIEW: The Troubles of Emil Cioran  »

March 24, 2023

Thanks to Eden Tesfaslassie, HMU 2022 Fellow in Ideas, for today’s post.

In Black Swan, the film utilizes the ballet performance Swan Lake, based on a fairytale, as a frame. The film uses other elements of the fairy tale genre, as evidenced by the character archetypes. The viewer can see characteristics of mothers, Prince Charmings, and villains reflected in the film’s ensemble cast.

 » Read more about: Mother Versus Lover  »

March 3, 2023

Thanks to Ally Zlatar, a 2023 HMU Fellow in Ideas, for today’s post.

Image Credits: Film Still, Miike, T. (Director). (2014). As the Gods Will. Toho.

Japanese death game films, also known as ‘Battle Royale’ films, typically depict a scenario where a group of individuals are forced to participate in a deadly game or competition,

 » Read more about: The Art of Japanese Death Game Films Through Analysis of As

February 24, 2023

Thanks to Eden Tesfaslassie, a 2022 Fellow in Ideas, for today’s post.

Quintilian said, “the height of art is to conceal art.” In this quote, conceal does not mean to hide away but to be fully immersed. There should be no separation between the art and the experience of the art itself– as a viewer or an artist. This idea can be seen in the film Black Swan when the dance instructor,

 » Read more about: Servant or Master?  »

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