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Tag: Gibbon

We’re excited that you’ve joined the conversation! At HMU, we want to continue the great authors’ conversations in a contemporary context, and this blog will help us do that. We look back to Aristotle and the early philosophers who used reason and discourse to gain wisdom and now we endeavor to do the same every day.

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September 2, 2016

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

Edward Gibbon’s Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire certainly discusses the idea of taste. He has a very rigid understanding of what classical Roman art should be. In fact, according to Gibbon, the stagnation of Rome’s art is one indicator of Rome’s decline. Gibbon writes,

“The triumphal arch of Constantine still remains a melancholy proof of the decline of the arts,

 » Read more about: A Discussion of Taste  »

April 29, 2016

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

The following list compiles ten things I learned about Gibbon by reading the footnotes from The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire. First of all, I highly recommend his footnotes, just for the fun of trying to puzzle out what Gibbon deems worthy of being source-material. But also, because his notes guide the reader to understand how he uses source materials,

 » Read more about: Reading Gibbon  »

December 11, 2015

Tracing a word back to its origins offers a fun experiment, even a well-known word that is easily understood. This simultaneously enables the ancient contexts and the word to come alive. For example, reading about the Roman emperor Septimius Severus, the word ‘severe’ often comes to mind, which is not entirely a coincidence. Severus was severe in his treatment of enemies, opponents and those who felt entitled to goods without earning them.

 » Read more about: From Severus to Severe  »

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