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Tag: Identity

We’re excited that you’ve joined the conversation! At HMU, we want to continue the great authors’ conversations in a contemporary context, and this blog will help us do that. We look back to Aristotle and the early philosophers who used reason and discourse to gain wisdom and now we endeavor to do the same every day.

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July 8, 2022

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

Happiness is of such importance that the Declaration of Independence uses it as a foundational principle. Considering its importance in my own society, one would think that I thoroughly understand the term. However, it is as slippery today as it has always been. Sometimes I believe that my own personal happiness is necessary because it will assist me to support those around me.

 » Read more about: Where is Happiness  »

February 11, 2022

Thanks to Gabriel E. Etienne, a 2021 Fellow in Ideas recipient, for today’s post.

The movie Moonlight is a coming-of-age story that details the complexity of the journey of boyhood to manhood of the character Little/Black/Chiron through the issues of authentic Blackness and hegemonic masculinity (Johnson 2003). This review uses the concepts of Quiet and Silence to view and understand the movie Moonlight.

 » Read more about: Film Review: Quiet and Silence in Moonlight  »

May 8, 2020

Thanks to Dylan O’Hara, a 2020 Fellow in Ideas, for today’s post.

In Smeltertown: Making and Remembering a Southwest Border Community, Monica Perales writes a new history of borderland life, chronicling the lives and memories of Chicano El Pasoans working at and living near The American Smelting and Mining Company (ASARCO). In compiling an urban history of El Paso around ASARCO, Perales reveals new insights about the struggles,

 » Read more about: BOOK REVIEW: Smeltertown by Monica Perales  »

March 6, 2020

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

“There’s more truth in myth than in truth.” – Natalie Diaz

Toni Morrison’s Nobel Prize speech clearly demonstrates her brilliance. She speaks in parables that are simultaneously straightforward, honest, and complicated. In this speech, Morrison delivers a story of some children who approach an old, blind woman and ask her what they have in their hands.

 » Read more about: Gratitude for Toni Morrison  »

January 17, 2020

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

“[G]ive me a life/ wherever there is opportunity/ to live, and better life than was my father’s.” – Oedipus the King by Sophocles (translated by David Grene)

Last week, I discussed a play from around 430 BC as well as a novel published in 2019. It would seem that works separated by over 2,000 years would hold no commonalities.

 » Read more about: Creating An Identity  »

August 31, 2018

Thanks to George Hickman, a 2018 Harrison Middleton University Fellow in Ideas recipient, for today’s post.

For most of us, we experience the role of an audience member far more often than we experience the role of an artist. On our daily commutes, our mood is at the whim of the radio or our playlist on shuffle. We leave the movie theater buzzing with conversation about the actors,

 » Read more about: The Audience as the Artist: LARP’s Place in Media  »

August 17, 2018

Thanks to Sam Risak, a 2018 Harrison Middleton University Fellow in Ideas recipient, for today’s post.

Ramona Ausubel’s short story “Atria” illustrates the ineffectiveness of logic against constructed but powerful societal pressure. She imagines the struggle of teenage pregnancy through the eyes of Hazel. Regardless of the outside evidence Ausubel provides that the child is a healthy girl,

 » Read more about: Forget Blue or Brown Eyes, My Baby Will Have Five-Hundred Eyes  »

April 6, 2018

Thanks to Carter Vance, a 2018 Harrison Middleton University Fellow in Ideas, for today’s post.

When the European Union first gave legal force the notion of “right to be forgotten”, in a 2014 court ruling against Google, I was amongst those who were both confused at the practical impacts and fearful of what its long-term effects might be. Confused,

 » Read more about: Right to Be Forgotten, or Right to Evolve?  »

March 9, 2018

Thanks to Sam Risak, a 2018 Harrison Middleton University Fellow in Ideas recipient, for today’s post.

An unnamed narrator sheds weight but not her past in Carmen Maria Machado’s “Eight Bites.” After a gastric bypass surgery, old flesh is personified into a “body with nothing it needs: no stomach or bones or mouth” that lingers in the protagonist’s house (165). Machado’s surrealist blurring of realities rejects the possibility for any universal ideals,

 » Read more about: Eight Bites Do Not Satisfy Me  »

September 22, 2017

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

Last week, I attended a lecture at St. John’s College titled, “The Intermittencies of the Self: Philosophic and Poetic Inquiries into the Nature of Selfhood (Or: Is Literature the Most Important Activity a Human Being Can Engage in, and Should You Dedicate Your Life to It?)”. The speaker, David Carl, used a number of texts to trace an argument about the way that a self may be constructed.

 » Read more about: Defining the Self  »

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