Harrison Middleton University
The Raven
Gertrude Stein
astronomical clock
Rachel Carson

Tag: Justice

We’re excited that you’ve joined the conversation! At HMU, we want to continue the great authors’ conversations in a contemporary context, and this blog will help us do that. We look back to Aristotle and the early philosophers who used reason and discourse to gain wisdom and now we endeavor to do the same every day.

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November 3, 2023

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

The October Quarterly Discussion merged two chapters from The Prince by Machiavelli with a chapter from Gibbon’s Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire. Of prime interest was the focus on the Roman Emperor Septimius Severus. Machiavelli presents him as a champion of the princely cause since he successfully tricked and killed his opponents,

 » Read more about: Gibbon Meets Machiavelli  »

February 18, 2022

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

In Akira Kurosawa’s 1950 film Rashomon few facts can be established. As with most murder mysteries, the viewer sees a tangled web of evidence unfold before them. Unlike most murder mysteries, the audience begins to assume the role of judge and jury. Though we never receive an answer to the crime, the audience weighs details from each testimonial.

 » Read more about: Truth in Rashomon  »

January 28, 2022

Thanks to Rebecca L. Thacker, a 2021 HMU Fellow in Ideas, for today’s post.

As we enter the new year, as per usual the media is filled with “year-in-review” articles and listicles: the year’s best books, tv, movies, and music, the top ten highlights of 2021, those we’ve lost in 2021. The Associated Press’s Year in Review features articles on the January 6 insurrection,

 » Read more about: Literature as “Artivism”: The Exonerated  »

August 13, 2021

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

“Witchery works to scare people, to make them fear growth. But it [growth] has always been necessary, and more than ever now, it is. Otherwise we won’t make it. We won’t survive. That’s what the witchery is counting on: that we will cling to the ceremonies the way they were, and then their power will triumph, and the people will be no more.” –

 » Read more about: The Bacchae  »

July 30, 2021

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

In the History of the Peloponnesian War, Thucydides spends a few pages describing a conflict between the island of Melos and the Athenian superpower. After the unsuccessful attempt at diplomacy, the Athenians surround the island. The story ends with the Athenians annihilating the entire Melian population. In what is commonly referred to as “The Melian Dialogue,” Thucydides writes:

“Meanwhile the Melians in a night attack took the part of the Athenian lines opposite the market,

 » Read more about: The Melian Dialogue  »

July 23, 2021

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

Harrison Middleton University’s July Quarterly Discussion revolved around ideas of justice. We focused on two pieces of literature, one excerpt from Thucydides and the other a letter written by Simón Bolívar. Both pieces introduce ideas of justice which deserve a second look in comparison to our understanding of justice today. Thanks to the participants of July’s Quarterly discussion which,

 » Read more about: Working Definition of Justice  »

April 23, 2021

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

The universal nature of our coursework at Harrison Middleton University is part of its appeal. Sometimes aligning two things that seem very distinct can actually illustrate interesting connections. This was the case with the readings for our most recent public discussion, the April Quarterly Discussion. The Quarterly Discussion series was created with the intention of looking at snapshot-sized readings and investigating the ideas presented.

 » Read more about: Hesiod Meets Ginsberg  »

August 3, 2018

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

Each quarter, Harrison Middleton University hosts a Quarterly Discussion. This discussion is open to students and non-students alike. They focus on a short text which everyone reads prior to the discussion. I thoroughly enjoy these because they give me a chance to break away from my own studies, to focus on something in a small group which is a great listening opportunity.

 » Read more about: Questions on Augustine  »

June 2, 2017

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

Reading through the list of punishments in Dante’s Inferno had a very visceral effect on me. I was thinking about the type of lifestyle that would lead one to create such insane punishments. After putting a little bit of thought into systems of punishment, I decided (squeamishness aside) to investigate other ancient texts that include codes of conduct.

 » Read more about: Code of Law  »

January 13, 2017

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

U2 performing MLK

 Common, “A Dream”

Martin Luther King, Jr. was one of the most vocal and prolific proponents of a path to peace through nonviolence. He fought with words and love and forgiveness, instead of fear and anger. He responded to death threats, violence and hatred with patience and understanding.

 » Read more about: King’s Speech  »

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