Harrison Middleton University
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Tag: Man

We’re excited that you’ve joined the conversation! At HMU, we want to continue the great authors’ conversations in a contemporary context, and this blog will help us do that. We look back to Aristotle and the early philosophers who used reason and discourse to gain wisdom and now we endeavor to do the same every day.

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December 15, 2023

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

Apollonius of Rhodes fleshed out the story of Jason and Medea in The Voyage of the Argo. It describes a love story within a tale already full of adventure. More than a few things strike me as interesting about this work, such as the ship itself which creates a safe space for this rowdy band of heroes.

 » Read more about: The Voyage of the Argo  »

August 18, 2023

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

Harrison Middleton University hosts regularly scheduled discussions for the public as well as students. Open to anyone interested in intellectual discussion, short, easily digestible readings are provided electronically. If you’re interested in more information, reach me at as****@hm*.edu.

Our most recent Quarterly Discussion focused on Thomas Nagel’s article “What Is It Like to Be a Bat?” and the first section of David Hume’s Treatise on Human Nature.

 » Read more about: Nagel and Hume on Consciousness  »

January 13, 2023

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

Readers of Euripides might suspect that he disliked gods and heroes. For example, The Bacchae makes Dionysus appear like a megalomaniac. Hippolytus presents Aphrodite as a ruthless gamer. And in Heracles, the great hero returns from war only to brutally murder his family. Even many of Euripides’ contemporaries disliked his violence,

 » Read more about: The Cyclops by Euripides  »

September 2, 2022

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

Years ago, under the pressures of student life, I read the full volume of Plutarch’s Lives of the Noble Grecians and Romans (often referred to as Parallel Lives). Honestly, I was dreading it because I harbored assumptions about some of these ancient texts. (And we all know what a mistake it is to assume anything.) At that time,

 » Read more about: Plutarch Is My Favorite  »

Friday, May 6, 2022

Thanks to David Kirichenko, a 2022 Fellow in Ideas recipient, for today’s post.

Understanding your place in the universe is difficult. It requires facing, and then transcending, your deepest concerns, with death as one of our core fears. One day you will die. Everyone you know and love will die. All of us began aging from the day we were born, and death does not wait at the end of life’s road – it is with us throughout life’s journey.

 » Read more about: The Art of Meditating on Mortality  »

April 8, 2022

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

I spent the past few months investigating Artificial Intelligence (AI). Though it resides far outside of my educational background, AI actually affects nearly every field. More importantly, however, is how little understood it is. I have asked numerous people to define it, but in response I get a handful of vague answers. Encyclopedia Britannica says that it is “the ability of a digital computer or computer-controlled robot to perform tasks commonly associated with intelligent beings.” It often includes thought processes such as reasoning,

 » Read more about: Artificial Intelligence  »

March 11, 2022

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

Last week marked the end of HMU’s Winter Film Series. I cannot express how much I love this series. If you were unable to join us, never fear, we will host another film series next winter. In the meantime, the following thoughts resulted from this wonderful discussion.

As usual, leader Gary Schoepfel opened discussion with some quotations focused on the idea of Truth.

 » Read more about: Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead, Film Discussion  »

August 13, 2021

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

“Witchery works to scare people, to make them fear growth. But it [growth] has always been necessary, and more than ever now, it is. Otherwise we won’t make it. We won’t survive. That’s what the witchery is counting on: that we will cling to the ceremonies the way they were, and then their power will triumph, and the people will be no more.” –

 » Read more about: The Bacchae  »

November 6, 2020

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

The Social Contract has been on my mind a lot lately. Of course, elections and coronavirus and all of the current stresses on society have been on my mind, and they often circle me back into what it means to exist in a community at all. What is the sort of contract that I have with fellow citizens?

 » Read more about: The Social Contract  »

September 18, 2020

Thanks to Dean Coslovi, a 2020 HMU Fellow in Ideas, for today’s post.

You must wish to consume yourself in your own flame: how could you wish to become new unless you had first become ashes! – Thus Spoke Zarathustra, Friedrich Nietzsche

In Thus Spoke Zarathustra, Friedrich Nietzsche’s enlightened sage, “Zarathustra”, declares that there are “three metamorphoses” of the human spirit: the camel,

 » Read more about: The Overman, The Child, and Oskar Schindler  »

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