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Tag: Plutarch

We’re excited that you’ve joined the conversation! At HMU, we want to continue the great authors’ conversations in a contemporary context, and this blog will help us do that. We look back to Aristotle and the early philosophers who used reason and discourse to gain wisdom and now we endeavor to do the same every day.

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November 4, 2022

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

For the October Quarterly Discussion, we read Plutarch’s “Coriolanus” and a speech by David McCullough titled “Knowing History and Knowing Who We Are.” I was not really sure if this combination would work because of the great differences between the two pieces. Plutarch’s biography portends to be history, but is simultaneously a commentary on culture,

 » Read more about: Plutarch Meets McCullough  »

July 3, 2020

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

The authors of the Federalist Papers often cite Plutarch’s Parallel Lives. I, too, am amazed in Plutarch’s broad, holistic analysis of ancient peoples and places. When I first read Plutarch’s works, their current applicability surprised me. I am no longer surprised by this. Rather, I return to his words again and again as a way of understanding contemporary issues.

 » Read more about: Federalist Papers for the Fourth  »

October 27, 2017

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

In most cases, letter writing became fashionable only after the establishment of a postal service. However, state business has been conducted via the written letter since the beginning of formal governments. Our most recent Quarterly Discussion focused on six different letters from the likes of Seneca all the way up to George H. W. Bush. We looked at Leonardo da Vinci’s job application in the form of a letter to the Duke of Milan.

 » Read more about: October Discussion Review  »

July 28, 2017

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

“what other end or period is there of all the wars and dangers which hapless princes run into, whose misery and folly it is, not merely that they make luxury and pleasure, instead of virtue and excellence, the object of their lives, but that they do not so much as know where this luxury and pleasure are to be found?” –

 » Read more about: July Quarterly Discussion Review  »

July 21, 2017

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

Last week we introduced a couple of less than mainstream calendars . This week, we want to move back into a look at the contemporary calendar, as based upon the Roman calendar. Julius Caesar, of course, attended to the discrepancies in the calendar. Astronomers of each age are challenged to find clever fixes for slight discrepancies, which,

 » Read more about: Numa Creates the Calendar  »

May 19, 2017

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s review. (This was originally published in the HMU: Dialogues May 2017 newsletter. You can find the rest of the newsletter at hmu.edu .)

Plutarch. The Lives of the Noble Grecians and Roman; The Dryden Translation.

Throughout the Lives of Noble Grecians and Romans, Plutarch surprised me with his repeated generosity and devotion to virtue.

 » Read more about: Plutarch Review  »

May 12, 2017

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

Communication necessarily involves empathy. To listen requires a silencing of the self. However, to understand requires tools contained within the self. This opens up a paradox: how to listen and translate at the same time. Non-verbal communication often enhances face-to-face interactions. Literature gives any number of wonderful scenes enhanced by non-verbal cues. As I think about and develop an understanding of non-verbal communication for today’s post,

 » Read more about: Picking Up On The Cues  »

March 10, 2017

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

Plutarch’s Parallel Lives gives the reader a great amount of information about language. It is an invaluable resource when looking at language changes over a period of time. More importantly, Plutarch explains that language is affected both by cultural change, but also demonstrates how language change is based upon proximity to other cultures. I have mentioned in past blog posts how place names depend upon the current cultural story of a place.

 » Read more about: Ovation  »

February 10, 2017

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

Recently, I was having a discussion about Plutarch and I found myself really interested in the history behind place names. I give Plutarch much credit for preserving the stories and details behind stories that certainly would have been lost otherwise. We often take for granted the places where live and the streets we drive upon, not realizing that, often,

 » Read more about: Palimpsests  »

January 6, 2017

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

The translation of Plutarch’s Parallel Lives contains some extremely long and complicated sentences. It comes as no surprise that the Dryden translations of Plutarch suffer from a lack of punctuation since the original Greek did not contain any punctuation either. In fact, scholars today cannot completely agree upon when to use a comma versus parentheses.

 » Read more about: Parentheses  »

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