Harrison Middleton University
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Tag: Self

We’re excited that you’ve joined the conversation! At HMU, we want to continue the great authors’ conversations in a contemporary context, and this blog will help us do that. We look back to Aristotle and the early philosophers who used reason and discourse to gain wisdom and now we endeavor to do the same every day.

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March 9, 2018

Thanks to Sam Risak, a 2018 Harrison Middleton University Fellow in Ideas recipient, for today’s post.

An unnamed narrator sheds weight but not her past in Carmen Maria Machado’s “Eight Bites.” After a gastric bypass surgery, old flesh is personified into a “body with nothing it needs: no stomach or bones or mouth” that lingers in the protagonist’s house (165). Machado’s surrealist blurring of realities rejects the possibility for any universal ideals,

 » Read more about: Eight Bites Do Not Satisfy Me  »

November 10, 2017

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s blog.

In an attempt to better understand how we orient ourselves in life, I turn to Dante.

In The Divine Comedy, Dante begins nearly every canto by determining his location. This works twofold as it locates the reader as well as the narrator. The reader first meets Dante in a dark wood where he is surprised by a scary and threatening creature.

 » Read more about: Dante’s Position  »

September 22, 2017

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

Last week, I attended a lecture at St. John’s College titled, “The Intermittencies of the Self: Philosophic and Poetic Inquiries into the Nature of Selfhood (Or: Is Literature the Most Important Activity a Human Being Can Engage in, and Should You Dedicate Your Life to It?)”. The speaker, David Carl, used a number of texts to trace an argument about the way that a self may be constructed.

 » Read more about: Defining the Self  »

September 15, 2017

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

“The mind’s dignity is to acknowledge that it is limited and that reality is outside it.”

Fernando Pessoa’s The Education of the Stoic is a thought-project based on the construct of a fully rational self through the fictional persona of The Baron of Teive. From the beginning, the text unsettles the reader. In a book that attempts to define a self,

 » Read more about: Pessoa Constructs a Self  »

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