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Tag: Taste

We’re excited that you’ve joined the conversation! At HMU, we want to continue the great authors’ conversations in a contemporary context, and this blog will help us do that. We look back to Aristotle and the early philosophers who used reason and discourse to gain wisdom and now we endeavor to do the same every day.

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Aristotle

September 22, 2023

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

For me, Aristotle’s Poetics is less about advice for the writer than it is about defining structures. By that, I mean that Aristotle wants us to understand how to produce good art that expresses an important aspect of human nature. He goes so far as to define individual letters as necessary grammatical units which sustain the larger infrastructure.

 » Read more about: Translating Aristotle’s Poetics  »

December 2, 2022

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

I used to whiz right past any additional sections of a book. Focused only on main content, I often skipped the introduction or preface, background material, acknowledgments or footnotes. In other words, I used to skip a lot of text. I chalk this up to being a lazy student, but just in terms of cost effectiveness alone, clearly I wasn’t getting my money’s worth.

 » Read more about: Acknowledgments  »

August 24, 2018

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

How do algorithms know which options are right for you? They are purportedly a mathematical calculation based on personal tastes, previous preferences and your own interaction. I will use examples from Pandora and Netflix to express my meaning, but really, I could broaden this discussion to any number of entities. Also, I am using a very broad understanding of algorithms for this general discussion.

 » Read more about: Swing and A Miss  »

June 15, 2018

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

“A wise man always eats well.” – Chinese proverb

MFK Fisher (a friend and contemporary of Julia Child) first published How to Cook a Wolf in 1942 in the midst of World War II. The book deals with domestic stresses during war time, especially those related to food rations. The essays deal with economic purchasing and energy savings,

 » Read more about: How to Cook a Wolf  »

September 9, 2016

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

First, something to listen to while you read more about taste: “The Lass of Peaty’s Mill” from Francesco Geminiani’s Treatise of Good Taste in the Art of Musick (Susan Hamilton, The Rare Fruits Council, Manfredo Kraemer). Find the full cd here.

Taste, according to Merriam-Webster: a] critical judgment,

 » Read more about: Taste in Art and Music  »

September 2, 2016

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

Edward Gibbon’s Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire certainly discusses the idea of taste. He has a very rigid understanding of what classical Roman art should be. In fact, according to Gibbon, the stagnation of Rome’s art is one indicator of Rome’s decline. Gibbon writes,

“The triumphal arch of Constantine still remains a melancholy proof of the decline of the arts,

 » Read more about: A Discussion of Taste  »

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