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Tag: Technology

We’re excited that you’ve joined the conversation! At HMU, we want to continue the great authors’ conversations in a contemporary context, and this blog will help us do that. We look back to Aristotle and the early philosophers who used reason and discourse to gain wisdom and now we endeavor to do the same every day.

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December 8, 2023

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

In You Are Not A Gadget, Jaron Lanier mentions that early web designers chose files over other organizational systems. Now, information is so regularly compiled into manageable units called files that you probably do not even second guess it. By clicking on the small manila file folder, one is able to see a list of the documents it contains.

 » Read more about: Filing Systems  »

December 1, 2023

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

We’ve all done it. Looking for quick information on some random subject, we inevitably turn to Wikipedia. Created in 2001, Wikipedia is an encyclopedia open to edits, a collaborative effort. Merriam-Webster defines “wiki” as “a website that allows visitors to make changes, contributions, or corrections.” Merriam-Webster also claims that the first use of wiki is in 1995 (Wikipedia itself,

 » Read more about: Understanding Wikipedia  »

Thanks to Aaron Ducksworth, a 2023 Fellow in Ideas, for today’s post.

November 10, 2023

Many movies of various genres have been made about the relationship between humans and anthropomorphic technology and the complicated relationship between them – think The Terminator franchise (1984-2019), I, Robot (2004), Virtuosity (1995), and The Matrix franchise (1999-2021). M3GAN is different! Not because it attempts to bridge the gap between horror and science fiction through an AI-based film,

 » Read more about: FILM REVIEW: Philosophical Roots in Tech-Horror  »

Wisdom

October 6, 2023

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

I recently attended a conference in which the speaker mentioned that, despite all of humanity’s vast resources, there has been no visible or recognizable increase in human wisdom. The speaker desired proof of some growth in wisdom which would demonstrate that, over time, humans learn from their mistakes. In the speaker’s estimation, current cultures should theoretically be much wiser than their predecessors after thousands of years with mythology,

 » Read more about: Path of Wisdom  »

September 15, 2023

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

I recently participated in a three day online festival hosted by The Chronicle of Higher Education. The topics to be discussed mentioned AI and technology which happen to be recent fascinations of mine. Though I did not know what to expect, I immensely enjoyed the conference. Not only was it well-organized, the topics were timely and vital to the community of higher education.

 » Read more about: ChronFest 2023  »

August 4, 2023

Thanks to Dave Seng, HMU alumnus, for today’s post.    

In our last two posts we examined the nature of difficult questions—questions which cannot be reduced to utility or calculation and the rationality of humans contrasted with the functionality of AI. In this post I want to explore the question of wisdom. I will further develop why the hard irreducible questions might be a source of wisdom and then I want to explore how information is structured for human understanding which might lead to wisdom. Using this foundation,

 » Read more about: Will AI Ever Become Wise?  »

July 28, 2023

Thanks to Dave Seng, HMU alumnus, for today’s post.

To read the previous post in this series, visit hmu.edu

In our last post we looked at the importance of questions and why self-reflection as individuals and a society is important. It seems part of the human situation to ask questions in order to better understand who we are and how to navigate the world. In our discussion series,

 » Read more about: Can AI Have Human Rationality?  »

July 21, 2023

Thanks to HMU Alumnus, Dave Seng, for today’s blog post.

I recently participated in the fall discussion series, What the Greeks can Teach us About AI.  The series focused on four Greek plays — Prometheus Bound by Aeschylus; and Herakles, The Bacchae, and Medea by Euripides.  The discussions were insightful and explored many fascinating questions related to the human condition and societal concerns centering around technology and artificial intelligence (AI). 

 » Read more about: Can AI Help Us With Important Human Questions?  »

July 14, 2023

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

Following our discussion series “What the Greeks Can Teach Us About AI,” I have become increasingly interested in understanding the uses and reasons for using artificial intelligence (AI). Throughout the series, participants repeated the notion that AI was simply a tool. While I believe this is true, I keep returning to the question: what is AI a tool for?

 » Read more about: A Different Sort of Tool  »

Conference Microphone

This year I presented unfinished work on purpose at a recent conference. I have seen people do this. It always seemed so brave and intimidating that I continually shied away…until this year. I have to be honest, rather than terrifying, it was extremely liberating. I began my presentation with the caveat that I was looking for advice and ideas. Unfortunately, our session ran long which cut short the Q and A portion. Yet, in the time that we had,

 » Read more about: Conference Feedback  »

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