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Tag: War

We’re excited that you’ve joined the conversation! At HMU, we want to continue the great authors’ conversations in a contemporary context, and this blog will help us do that. We look back to Aristotle and the early philosophers who used reason and discourse to gain wisdom and now we endeavor to do the same every day.

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November 4, 2022

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

For the October Quarterly Discussion, we read Plutarch’s “Coriolanus” and a speech by David McCullough titled “Knowing History and Knowing Who We Are.” I was not really sure if this combination would work because of the great differences between the two pieces. Plutarch’s biography portends to be history, but is simultaneously a commentary on culture,

 » Read more about: Plutarch Meets McCullough  »

April 16, 2021

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

In BattleBots, a television show based on robot combat, Faruq announces each competitor with poetic flair. His powerful voice and dominant presence animates the crowd and fans the flames of rivalry and competition. He riddles his introductions with puns which make them fun, silly, full of contemporary references, and also part of an ancient tradition.

 » Read more about: BattleBot Warfare  »

April 9, 2021

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

Today’s post is a brief look at translation and word choice in Thucydides. Both small sections from The History of the Peloponnesian War, Book IV, Chapter XII, furnish a glimpse of the author’s opinion. Though Thucydides set out to write a history of the war, and very conscientiously presents two balanced sides of the story, he cannot avoid opinion.

 » Read more about: The Opinion of a Historian  »

September 18, 2020

Thanks to Dean Coslovi, a 2020 HMU Fellow in Ideas, for today’s post.

You must wish to consume yourself in your own flame: how could you wish to become new unless you had first become ashes! – Thus Spoke Zarathustra, Friedrich Nietzsche

In Thus Spoke Zarathustra, Friedrich Nietzsche’s enlightened sage, “Zarathustra”, declares that there are “three metamorphoses” of the human spirit: the camel,

 » Read more about: The Overman, The Child, and Oskar Schindler  »

March 20, 2020

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

Dr. Deborah Deacon, a former Dean of Harrison Middleton University, co-authored a book entitled A Century in Uniform; Military Women in American Films, published earlier this year. Stacy Fowler and Dr. Deacon’s book dedicates a chapter to each decade (or so) since the introduction of film. They selected films that depict a woman in the military in some form or other.

 » Read more about: A Century in Uniform  »

February 28, 2020

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

To listen to a short run-through of all sixty paintings and captions by Jacob Lawrence, visit the Khan Academy’s tutorial or visit the Phillips Collection to view them one-by-one.

So much of Black History Month highlights notable African Americans who have contributed positive ideas and energy to this country. Jacob Lawrence is no exception,

 » Read more about: Jacob Lawrence’s Migration Series  »

September 6, 2019

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

I get very excited when the world combines disciplines in an unexpected way. Recently, I came across a children’s book entitled, Dazzle Ships: World War I and the Art of Confusion by Chris Barton and illustrated by Victo Ngai. Not only is this book elegant, descriptive, and interesting, it talks about the combination of art and war in a way that I had never seen before.

 » Read more about: Dazzle Ships  »

March 29, 2019

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

Enhance today’s blog by listening to three different musical interpretations of the land:

Zuni Rain Dance (30 seconds)

El Corrido de Norte” by Los Halcones De Salitrillo (4 min)

A’ts’ina: Place of Writings on Rock” by Michael Mauldin (1 min)

Inscription Trail may be off the beaten path according to today’s standards,

 » Read more about: Inscription Trail  »

March 8, 2019

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

“My men have behaved like women, my women like men!” – Xerxes

Strong women have always had a complicated relationship with history. They have been feared, reviled, loved, hated, killed, made into men, adored, and crowned (among other things). Artemisia is one such female. She married the king of Halicarnassus (now in present-day Turkey) and from the beginning Artemisia demonstrated strength and wit.

 » Read more about: Artemisia at Sea  »

November 16, 2018

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

In Left Hand of Darkness, Ursula Le Guin has her protagonist, Genly Ai, travel to the distant planet Gethen which has no birds or flying insects. As a result, the communities there never even thought to attempt flight and their language has no word for flying. It is no wonder, then, that the people mistrust Genly who arrives by airship.

 » Read more about: Imagination in Flight  »

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