Harrison Middleton University
The Raven
Gertrude Stein
astronomical clock
Rachel Carson

Tag: Women

We’re excited that you’ve joined the conversation! At HMU, we want to continue the great authors’ conversations in a contemporary context, and this blog will help us do that. We look back to Aristotle and the early philosophers who used reason and discourse to gain wisdom and now we endeavor to do the same every day.

CATEGORIES

December 15, 2023

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

Apollonius of Rhodes fleshed out the story of Jason and Medea in The Voyage of the Argo. It describes a love story within a tale already full of adventure. More than a few things strike me as interesting about this work, such as the ship itself which creates a safe space for this rowdy band of heroes.

 » Read more about: The Voyage of the Argo  »

October 13, 2023

Thanks to Ally Zlatar, a 2023 Fellow in Ideas, for today’s post.

My journey into the realm of art activism was ignited by my personal battle with severe ill health, which included a protracted struggle with an eating disorder spanning over a decade. Throughout my recovery journey, I came to realize that many, particularly within the medical profession, often fixated on the diagnosis rather than recognizing the person grappling with the illness.

 » Read more about: Ally Zlatar: Navigating the Intersection of Art and Activism  »

June 2, 2023

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

Last week’s blog (https://hmu.edu/2023-5-26-reading-rabelais-part-ii/) concluded with a suggested connection between Book Two of Rabelais’s Gargantua and Pantagruel and Monty Python skits. We cannot stop at the end of Book Two, however. Moving into Book Three, we find a lengthy discussion between Pantagruel and Panurge about the pros and cons of marriage. Panurge wants to know whether or not he should marry.

 » Read more about: Considering the Cuckold, Rabelais Continued  »

March 24, 2023

Thanks to Eden Tesfaslassie, HMU 2022 Fellow in Ideas, for today’s post.

In Black Swan, the film utilizes the ballet performance Swan Lake, based on a fairytale, as a frame. The film uses other elements of the fairy tale genre, as evidenced by the character archetypes. The viewer can see characteristics of mothers, Prince Charmings, and villains reflected in the film’s ensemble cast.

 » Read more about: Mother Versus Lover  »

September 17, 2021

Thanks to Rebecca L. Thacker, a 2021 HMU Fellow in Ideas, for today’s post.

Although I won’t deny the pleasures of “art for art’s sake” (I’m no stranger to a lazy day curled up with a plot driven page-turner), as a feminist cultural studies scholar, I’m interested in the role literature can play as a cultural change agent. Whether intentional or not, all literature is political.

 » Read more about: Science Fiction and Liberatory World-building  »

August 13, 2021

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

“Witchery works to scare people, to make them fear growth. But it [growth] has always been necessary, and more than ever now, it is. Otherwise we won’t make it. We won’t survive. That’s what the witchery is counting on: that we will cling to the ceremonies the way they were, and then their power will triumph, and the people will be no more.” –

 » Read more about: The Bacchae  »

June 25, 2021

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

It is easy to assume that the way things are now is the way that they have always been. For example, visiting a museum is commonplace now, however, museums have not always been around. In fact, “curiosity closets” predate museums and offer a glimpse into human history and curiosity, wealth and prestige, and naturalists and hobbyists.

 » Read more about: Summer Birds  »

May 28, 2021

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

Pericles, Prince of Tyre: written about 1607, by William Shakespeare
Comus”: written about 1637, by John Milton

Last week, I discussed the character of Pericles from Shakespeare’s Pericles, Prince of Tyre. This week, I will continue to explore Shakespeare’s play, but focus on Marina,

 » Read more about: Shakespeare’s Marina and Milton’s Lady  »

May 14, 2021

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post. (This article was originally published on Oh, The Humanities on April 29, 2021.)

Rebecca Mead’s book My Life in Middlemarch weaves a well-researched narrative that involves land, people, women, love, and story-telling, among other things. Mead incorporates her own journey to underscore the way that Middlemarch changes with every decade of life.

 » Read more about: My Life in Middlemarch and the Humanities  »

April 2, 2021

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

As a reader, and a human, I am always drawn towards love’s many dimensions. Unlike Janus who faces in two directions only (forward and backward), love is indescribably complex. For that reason, it absolutely fascinates me. Although Louise Glück’s book Ararat from 1990 includes many moments of pain and loss, it also offers an amazing lament for the idea of love.

 » Read more about: Louise Glück, Ararat  »

Scroll to Top
Skip to content