Harrison Middleton University
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Tag: Women’s History

We’re excited that you’ve joined the conversation! At HMU, we want to continue the great authors’ conversations in a contemporary context, and this blog will help us do that. We look back to Aristotle and the early philosophers who used reason and discourse to gain wisdom and now we endeavor to do the same every day.

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March 20, 2020

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

Dr. Deborah Deacon, a former Dean of Harrison Middleton University, co-authored a book entitled A Century in Uniform; Military Women in American Films, published earlier this year. Stacy Fowler and Dr. Deacon’s book dedicates a chapter to each decade (or so) since the introduction of film. They selected films that depict a woman in the military in some form or other.

 » Read more about: A Century in Uniform  »

September 13, 2019

“Nothing surpasses the joy of creation.” – Clara Schumann

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

I am indebted to Jade Simmons (pianist and storyteller) for most of this information. Check out her podcast Decomposed for a more detailed history of Clara Schumann.

How is it that Clara Schumann became a famous classical pianist at a time when women were not allowed on the stage?

 » Read more about: Clara Schumann  »

September 6, 2019

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

I get very excited when the world combines disciplines in an unexpected way. Recently, I came across a children’s book entitled, Dazzle Ships: World War I and the Art of Confusion by Chris Barton and illustrated by Victo Ngai. Not only is this book elegant, descriptive, and interesting, it talks about the combination of art and war in a way that I had never seen before.

 » Read more about: Dazzle Ships  »

March 29, 2019

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

Enhance today’s blog by listening to three different musical interpretations of the land:

Zuni Rain Dance (30 seconds)

El Corrido de Norte” by Los Halcones De Salitrillo (4 min)

A’ts’ina: Place of Writings on Rock” by Michael Mauldin (1 min)

Inscription Trail may be off the beaten path according to today’s standards,

 » Read more about: Inscription Trail  »

March 22, 2019

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz was born Juana Ramírez de Asbaje. Her actual date of birth is unknown, but is thought to be around 1651. At the age of three, she walked to a local school, told the teacher she was five years old, and asked to learn to read and write. Inspired by Juana’s determination the teacher helped her,

 » Read more about: Sor Juana’s Letter  »

March 15, 2019

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

Last week’s blog took a look at Artemisia, an ancient female mariner. Despite the lack of discussion in print, women have spent time at sea, either in disguise or as themselves. Artemisia is only one historical example of a strong female capable of captaining her own ships. Unfortunately, many of the stories have been lost or buried in unread journal entries.

 » Read more about: Female Cartographers  »

March 8, 2019

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

“My men have behaved like women, my women like men!” – Xerxes

Strong women have always had a complicated relationship with history. They have been feared, reviled, loved, hated, killed, made into men, adored, and crowned (among other things). Artemisia is one such female. She married the king of Halicarnassus (now in present-day Turkey) and from the beginning Artemisia demonstrated strength and wit.

 » Read more about: Artemisia at Sea  »

October 19, 2018

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

I often study the idea of Language. I am curious about how language comes to be meaningful, communicative and permanent. Yet, at the same time, language is so flexible and manipulative. This elasticity allows it to grow, change and expand to incorporate new ideas and influences. Yet, language can also restrict in unseen ways. One thing that is often forgotten,

 » Read more about: Language in the Words of Helen Keller  »

March 24, 2017

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

“Where there is great love, there are always miracles.”

“Human love was a wonderful thing and it was most wonderful where it had least to gain.”

After working her way to the top of McClure’s Magazine and becoming Editor, Willa Cather became very disinterested with the pressure and time constraints of a full time job.

 » Read more about: Why We Read Willa Cather  »

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