Harrison Middleton University
The Raven
Gertrude Stein
astronomical clock
Rachel Carson

Category: Art

We’re excited that you’ve joined the conversation! At HMU, we want to continue the great authors’ conversations in a contemporary context, and this blog will help us do that. We look back to Aristotle and the early philosophers who used reason and discourse to gain wisdom and now we endeavor to do the same every day.

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May 10, 2024

Thanks to Jennifer-NeToi Claiborne, a 2024 Fellow in Ideas, for today’s book review.

“To see with the “eyes of our hearts” (Ephesians 1:18) would be the goal of an imaginative journey and training, and the arts provide a perfect vehicle through which we can move past clogged, cluttered self absorption into the reliable communal body to experience the Spirit’s leading.” – Makoto Fujimura

As a poet,

 » Read more about: BOOK REVIEW: Art and Faith by Fujimura  »

April 12, 2024

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

Seeing that April is National Poetry Month, and poetry is one of my lifelong loves, I wanted to spend a few moments to share my experience. From songs and music, to rhyme and meter, I love it all. But people often ask me what I get out of poetry, what it does for me. So, today’s blog is a little nod to a discipline and art form that I have wrestled with for years.

 » Read more about: The Power of Poetry  »

March 8, 2024

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

If there’s one thing you know about me by now, it’s that I value discussion. This past weekend, a number of students, staff and alumni gathered in Tempe, Arizona for a rare in-person meeting. We last met just before COVID, which caused a few years hiatus. Happily, we were finally able to renew this tradition. HMU President Joe Coulson started us off with an excellent introductory discussion about the similarities between music and poetry.

 » Read more about: Sonny’s Blues Discussion  »

February 23, 2024

Thanks to Chad Greene, a 2023 Fellowship in Ideas recipient, for today’s blog.

“There is nothing new: all things are both familiar and short-lived,” the Roman emperor and Stoic philosopher Marcus Aurelius Antoninus wrote more than 1,800 years ago in the text that we tend to title the Meditations (VII.1). Marcus Aurelius did not give them this title; he merely referred to them by a Greek term that translates to “things to one’s self.” So,

 » Read more about: A Week’s Worth of Meditations to Help Prepare to Read Marcus Aurelius  »

November 17, 2023

Thanks to Chad Greene, a 2023 Fellowship in Ideas recipient, for today’s blog. 

            Of the classes I teach at my community college, the closest to a Great Books class is a course called “Masterpieces of World Literature” that the English department offers every fall. In this class I ask students to apply frameworks of shared inquiry that I have learned from taking Great Books classes for my professional development to our readings of classics such as the Epic of Gilgamesh of Sîn-lēqi-unninni,

 » Read more about: Classics and Comics: Ancient Content – and Advice – in a Modern Form  »

October 13, 2023

Thanks to Ally Zlatar, a 2023 Fellow in Ideas, for today’s post.

My journey into the realm of art activism was ignited by my personal battle with severe ill health, which included a protracted struggle with an eating disorder spanning over a decade. Throughout my recovery journey, I came to realize that many, particularly within the medical profession, often fixated on the diagnosis rather than recognizing the person grappling with the illness.

 » Read more about: Ally Zlatar: Navigating the Intersection of Art and Activism  »

Aristotle

September 29, 2023

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s blog.

In an effort to understand Aristotle’s use of the term “Discovery,” I will try to update some of his examples which are now obscure, difficult to track down, and sometimes missing entirely. Discovery is a vital plot element according to Aristotle, but without examples his ideas may be less impactful. Furthermore, discovery can apparently be used with more or less effectiveness,

 » Read more about: Modernizing Aristotle’s Poetics  »

Aristotle

September 22, 2023

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

For me, Aristotle’s Poetics is less about advice for the writer than it is about defining structures. By that, I mean that Aristotle wants us to understand how to produce good art that expresses an important aspect of human nature. He goes so far as to define individual letters as necessary grammatical units which sustain the larger infrastructure.

 » Read more about: Translating Aristotle’s Poetics  »

May 5, 2023

Thanks to Chad Greene, a 2023 HMU Fellow in Ideas, for today’s blog.

Sitting side-by-side on the top of my desk in the faculty office at my community college are two printed publications that contain the same story told through sequential art, “The Black Panther!” written by Stan Lee and drawn by Jack Kirby. On the left is a stapled comic book, a facsimile copy of the “floppy” Fantastic Four #52 published by Marvel Comics in 1966.

 » Read more about: From a Comic Book Hidden Under Desks to a Trade Paperback Displayed on Desks: Review of Penguin Classics Marvel Collection Black Panther  »

March 17, 2023

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

“[P]erhaps art is not, we might speculate, in the product itself, nor necessarily in the process, but in the impulse.” – Brian Christian from The Most Human Human

HMU recently wrapped up the Winter Film Series, which focused on the great idea of art. Discussions centered around three films: Black Swan (2010,

 » Read more about: HMU Film Series  »

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