Harrison Middleton University
The Raven
Gertrude Stein
astronomical clock
Rachel Carson

Category: Ethics

We’re excited that you’ve joined the conversation! At HMU, we want to continue the great authors’ conversations in a contemporary context, and this blog will help us do that. We look back to Aristotle and the early philosophers who used reason and discourse to gain wisdom and now we endeavor to do the same every day.

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February 2, 2024

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

Though we near the end of Bleak House, our focus remains on notions of charity. Next week will conclude our book club discussion with the eighth and final post. We have skipped much of the mystery and murder. I apologize for that, but I would hate to ruin the suspense for those who have not kept up the pace.

 » Read more about: Bleak House: The Scheming Skimpole  »

Machiavelli quote

September 8, 2023

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

If it’s been awhile since you have read Machiavelli’s The Prince, you might consider reading an excerpt with us this fall. We will examine two chapters of it in the October Quarterly Discussion. (Reach out to Alissa at as****@hm*.edu for more information). I was also thinking about how one might teach this work, how to bring it to life in the eyes of the students.

 » Read more about: The Prince and Pop Culture  »

May 13, 2022

Thanks to 2022 Fellow in Ideas, David Yamada, for today’s post.

Lost in Thought: The Hidden Pleasures of an Intellectual Life by Zena Hitz

As the humanities and social sciences face core threats fueled by higher education budget cuts and political divisions, they are conventionally defended on vocational and practical grounds. The liberal arts, so the argument goes, provide a strong grounding for successful careers by teaching students how to read,

 » Read more about: BOOK REVIEW: Lost in Thought  »

December 10, 2021

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

Recently I attended a webinar hosted by Middlebury College on the subject of data literacy. This webinar was part of a program called Middlebury Initiative for Data and Digital Methods (or Midd:data for short) and functioned as an introduction to the importance of data literacy. The program is founded upon the principle that “Data and digital methodologies are as central to a 21st-century liberal arts education as reading and writing.”

The webinar consisted of a discussion between Eric Schmidt,

 » Read more about: Data Literacy  »

November 5, 2021

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

“If you tear a plant out of the ground, more than its roots come up.” – William James

Today’s blog takes a peek at William James. Most of the following quotes come from The Pluralistic Universe, but a few are from other works of his. This list of quotes is meant only to function as an entry point into James’s ideas.

 » Read more about: William James Precepts  »

July 23, 2021

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

Harrison Middleton University’s July Quarterly Discussion revolved around ideas of justice. We focused on two pieces of literature, one excerpt from Thucydides and the other a letter written by Simón Bolívar. Both pieces introduce ideas of justice which deserve a second look in comparison to our understanding of justice today. Thanks to the participants of July’s Quarterly discussion which,

 » Read more about: Working Definition of Justice  »

February 19, 2021

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

Bearing witness is of primary importance in Raoul Peck’s documentary I am Not Your Negro. Using unfinished manuscripts by James Baldwin (which Baldwin had titled Remember This House), the film is separated into the following sections: “Paying My Dues,” “Heroes,” “Witness,” “Purity,” “Selling the Negro,” and “I am not a Nigger.” Throughout the book,

 » Read more about: Ideas of Witness from James Baldwin  »

February 5, 2021

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

“Joy, in part, is the justice we give ourselves.” – Dr. Drew Lanham

This post is about the love of being. Also, the love of birds. After listening to Krista Tippett (of OnBeing) interview Dr. Drew Lanham, ornithologist, writer, and Wildlife Biologist at Clemson University, I felt the first few positive strings of hope arrive.

 » Read more about: Joy of Being  »

January 29, 2021

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

“It is not easy to realize the serene joy of all the earth, when she commences to shine unobstructedly, unless you have often been abroad alone in moonlight nights.” – Henry David Thoreau

Discussions this month focused on Henry David Thoreau’s essay “Night and Moonlight” combined with Aldo Leopold’s “Land Ethic.” Both pieces propose a journey into nature,

 » Read more about: Thoreau’s Walk and Leopold’s Ethic  »

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