Harrison Middleton University
The Raven
Gertrude Stein
astronomical clock
Rachel Carson

Category: Time

We’re excited that you’ve joined the conversation! At HMU, we want to continue the great authors’ conversations in a contemporary context, and this blog will help us do that. We look back to Aristotle and the early philosophers who used reason and discourse to gain wisdom and now we endeavor to do the same every day.

CATEGORIES

February 10, 2023

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

Before reading the ideas in this blog, I invite you to view a piece by artist M.C. Escher and listen to the “Endlessly Rising Canon” by Bach.

In his book, Gödel, Escher, Bach: An Eternal Golden Braid, Douglas Hofstadter paraphrases Kurt Gödel’s Incompleteness Theorem as follows: “All consistent axiomatic formulations of number theory include undecidable propositions.” Although this is not where January’s Quarterly Discussion started,

 » Read more about: Aristotle and Hofstadter  »

August 20, 2021

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

I want to investigate the nature of time using three different sources: The Matrix, the recent Disney show Loki, and Jorge Luis Borges’s “Garden of Forking Paths.” Though very different, these three works embrace the concept of infinite futures. Their conceptualizations, then, allow us to explore notions of divergence, difference, and possibility.

In The Matrix,

 » Read more about: Forking Paths  »

June 14, 2019

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

Ancient history can be a difficult subject for students because it is inherently foreign to them. Not only is there a language difference, but it is genuinely difficult to envision life removed from today’s technologies. When speaking of ancient cities, most people think of ancient Greece or Rome, but today I want to focus on an ancient city of the southwestern United States.

 » Read more about: An Ancient Southwestern Town  »

July 27, 2018

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

Food is often thought of in terms of comfort, enjoyment, family gatherings, and parties. We have barbecues in summer and stews in winter. Messy finger foods accompany sporting events and polite finger foods accompany baby showers. These things are linked by their participation in custom. Custom (or convention), as discussed in the Syntopicon, stems from public opinion.

 » Read more about: Betty Crocker Culture  »

December 29, 2017

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

“Ring out the old, ring in the new, Ring, happy bells, across the snow; The year is going, let him go; Ring out the false, ring in the true.”  – Alfred, Lord Tennyson

Music for today’s post provided by Trio Mediaeval

I have heard of ringing in the new year. I have also heard of bringing in the new year.

 » Read more about: Ringing in the New Year  »

October 20, 2017

Thanks to Alissa Simon for today’s post.

Kant’s Science of Right takes time to read. In the Science of Right, Kant explains the interaction of theory with practice when defining ownership, rights, and equity. I find it difficult to pull short sections from his writing because all of his arguments build upon one another. I also find it nearly impossible to study a single quote with the hopes of gaining a better understanding to his arguments because,

 » Read more about: Charting Kant  »

October 6, 2017

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

Myth is what happens to a strong belief once the belief has changed. In other words, what was once firm belief, turns into cultural story and entertainment. They become important narratives, but not necessarily belief systems. For example, we know who Zeus is, but I doubt that anyone believes the story of Leda and the Swan. (I say that with some hesitation because one could argue that the story is really about transformation,

 » Read more about: On Tinkers  »

July 21, 2017

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

Last week we introduced a couple of less than mainstream calendars . This week, we want to move back into a look at the contemporary calendar, as based upon the Roman calendar. Julius Caesar, of course, attended to the discrepancies in the calendar. Astronomers of each age are challenged to find clever fixes for slight discrepancies, which,

 » Read more about: Numa Creates the Calendar  »

July 14, 2017

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

Merriam-Webster defines calendar as “a system for fixing the beginning, length, and divisions of the civil year and arranging days and longer divisions of time (such as weeks and months) in a definite order”. The reasons for developing such a system are easy to identify. It makes nearly all business navigable. Practicality aside, however, the idea of a calendar actually stemmed from those who noticed nature’s rhythms.

 » Read more about: Rare Calendars  »

April 7, 2017

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

“It is only by becoming sensible of our natural disadvantages that we shall be roused to exertion, and prompted to seek out opportunities of discovering the operations now in progress, such as do not present themselves readily to view.” – Charles Lyell

Charles Lyell first published the Principles of Geology in 1830. However, over the next thirty years,

 » Read more about: Petrified National Forest  »

Scroll to Top
Skip to content