Harrison Middleton University
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Category: Philosophy

We’re excited that you’ve joined the conversation! At HMU, we want to continue the great authors’ conversations in a contemporary context, and this blog will help us do that. We look back to Aristotle and the early philosophers who used reason and discourse to gain wisdom and now we endeavor to do the same every day.

CATEGORIES

April 19, 2024

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

“You can’t ever reach perfection, but you can believe in an asymptote toward which you are ceaselessly striving.” – Paul Kalanithi

Last week, I attended an online conference hosted by The Atlantic. The “Health Summit” promoted discussions of: “the future of scaling innovation, sustainable solutions to improve patient care, and the complexity and opportunity in this revolutionary moment in health care.” They did not disappoint.

 » Read more about: Investigating Health  »

March 29, 2024

Thanks to Jennifer-NeToi Claiborne, a 2024 HMU Fellow in Ideas, for today’s post. 

When the air is warm, the smell of rain and honeysuckles fill the breeze, I know that it is summer and it is time to return to Siddhartha. I first read this book in the summer of 2000, when I was in the midst of a great change in my life. It was the summer prior to entering my freshman year of college.

 » Read more about: For Each Summer, There Is Siddhartha  »

February 23, 2024

Thanks to Chad Greene, a 2023 Fellowship in Ideas recipient, for today’s blog.

“There is nothing new: all things are both familiar and short-lived,” the Roman emperor and Stoic philosopher Marcus Aurelius Antoninus wrote more than 1,800 years ago in the text that we tend to title the Meditations (VII.1). Marcus Aurelius did not give them this title; he merely referred to them by a Greek term that translates to “things to one’s self.” So,

 » Read more about: A Week’s Worth of Meditations to Help Prepare to Read Marcus Aurelius  »

February 16, 2024

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

Every January, our Quarterly Discussion centers around Natural Science. Since I was recently reading Carlo Rovelli’s book Anaximander and the Birth of Science, I decided to focus this discussion on the rift between science and philosophy. This is a subject which Rovelli writes about extensively. Honestly, I don’t fully understand the discord, so I used this discussion to better comprehend the places where science and philosophy meet as well as the places which cause the most debate.

 » Read more about: January Quarterly Discussion Review  »

January 5, 2024

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

Dickens’ incredible prose is a pleasure to read. The magic of fog and mud curls around the reader, until an intense cocoon settles over the whole as in a spell. Moving between Esther Summerson’s narration and the omniscient narrator helps to pull the reader in and create a sense of community with the book. I am ignorant of the slum of Tom-all-Alone’s,

 » Read more about: Telescopic Philanthropy  »

Thanks to Aaron Ducksworth, a 2023 Fellow in Ideas, for today’s post.

November 10, 2023

Many movies of various genres have been made about the relationship between humans and anthropomorphic technology and the complicated relationship between them – think The Terminator franchise (1984-2019), I, Robot (2004), Virtuosity (1995), and The Matrix franchise (1999-2021). M3GAN is different! Not because it attempts to bridge the gap between horror and science fiction through an AI-based film,

 » Read more about: FILM REVIEW: Philosophical Roots in Tech-Horror  »

October 27, 2023

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

Viola Cordova was one of the first Native American women to earn a degree in philosophy. Born in 1937, she grew up in Taos, New Mexico. Embracing both her own past and her curiosity of the world, she discarded notions that philosophy should be separated into categories like white or western. Instead, she focused on using all of the tools that we have been given,

 » Read more about: V. F. Cordova Describes Energy  »

Wisdom

October 6, 2023

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

I recently attended a conference in which the speaker mentioned that, despite all of humanity’s vast resources, there has been no visible or recognizable increase in human wisdom. The speaker desired proof of some growth in wisdom which would demonstrate that, over time, humans learn from their mistakes. In the speaker’s estimation, current cultures should theoretically be much wiser than their predecessors after thousands of years with mythology,

 » Read more about: Path of Wisdom  »

Machiavelli quote

September 8, 2023

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

If it’s been awhile since you have read Machiavelli’s The Prince, you might consider reading an excerpt with us this fall. We will examine two chapters of it in the October Quarterly Discussion. (Reach out to Alissa at as****@hm*.edu for more information). I was also thinking about how one might teach this work, how to bring it to life in the eyes of the students.

 » Read more about: The Prince and Pop Culture  »

Whitehead poem vectors

September 1, 2023

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

The following poem is constructed entirely from Sections VI-XI from Chapter III (“The Order of Nature”) in Alfred North Whitehead’s Process and Reality. To create the poem, I simply chose sections of text from Whitehead’s own words. Therefore, none of the remaining words are mine, I have merely excerpted and arranged them with a few added symbols. I like think that Whitehead would appreciate a mathematical-leaning poem,

 » Read more about: Found Poem with Whitehead’s Words  »

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