Harrison Middleton University
The Raven
Gertrude Stein
astronomical clock
Rachel Carson

Category: Liberal Arts

We’re excited that you’ve joined the conversation! At HMU, we want to continue the great authors’ conversations in a contemporary context, and this blog will help us do that. We look back to Aristotle and the early philosophers who used reason and discourse to gain wisdom and now we endeavor to do the same every day.

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April 5, 2024

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

It’s an unlikely pairing, but reading Moby Dick feels a lot like taking a deep dive into a Queen album. First, you’re in gospel, then punk rock, then opera, and all of this about some seemingly mundane thing, like a bicycle. Or, in the case of Moby Dick, into the world of whaling. There are entire chapters on the shape of a whale’s head,

 » Read more about: Moby Dick and Queen  »

March 15, 2024

Thanks to Bill Maniotis, current HMU student, for today’s blog.

I began my first course (HUM 701: The Great Conversation: The Cornerstone Course) at Harrison Middleton University in April of 2019, and I am about to finish up my coursework at HMU with my second comprehensive exam on the Great Idea of Love in April of 2024, before I move on to working on my Capstone project this summer.

 » Read more about: Community Weekend, A Student’s Perspective  »

March 1, 2024

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s blog.

Every spring, I am fortunate enough to attend the Southwest Popular/American Culture Association (SWPACA) conference. Every year, I come away with such enthusiasm for next year’s conference. How refreshing to be engaged in lively roundtable discussions with friendly and interested peers! I enjoy learning the breadth (and depth) of other’s special interests. It’s just so fun to meet people who are also interested in popular culture.

 » Read more about: Conference Conundrums  »

November 24, 2023

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

Each fall, Great Books San Francisco hosts a Poetry Weekend. And if there’s one thing that I’m grateful for in this world, it’s poetry. I love to attend this event because of its hybrid nature. The first day is filled with reading and discussion. Groups of fifteen or so are separated into Zoom spaces where we read,

 » Read more about: Poetic Gratitude  »

November 17, 2023

Thanks to Chad Greene, a 2023 Fellowship in Ideas recipient, for today’s blog. 

            Of the classes I teach at my community college, the closest to a Great Books class is a course called “Masterpieces of World Literature” that the English department offers every fall. In this class I ask students to apply frameworks of shared inquiry that I have learned from taking Great Books classes for my professional development to our readings of classics such as the Epic of Gilgamesh of Sîn-lēqi-unninni,

 » Read more about: Classics and Comics: Ancient Content – and Advice – in a Modern Form  »

October 27, 2023

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

Viola Cordova was one of the first Native American women to earn a degree in philosophy. Born in 1937, she grew up in Taos, New Mexico. Embracing both her own past and her curiosity of the world, she discarded notions that philosophy should be separated into categories like white or western. Instead, she focused on using all of the tools that we have been given,

 » Read more about: V. F. Cordova Describes Energy  »

September 15, 2023

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

I recently participated in a three day online festival hosted by The Chronicle of Higher Education. The topics to be discussed mentioned AI and technology which happen to be recent fascinations of mine. Though I did not know what to expect, I immensely enjoyed the conference. Not only was it well-organized, the topics were timely and vital to the community of higher education.

 » Read more about: ChronFest 2023  »

Whitehead poem vectors

September 1, 2023

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

The following poem is constructed entirely from Sections VI-XI from Chapter III (“The Order of Nature”) in Alfred North Whitehead’s Process and Reality. To create the poem, I simply chose sections of text from Whitehead’s own words. Therefore, none of the remaining words are mine, I have merely excerpted and arranged them with a few added symbols. I like think that Whitehead would appreciate a mathematical-leaning poem,

 » Read more about: Found Poem with Whitehead’s Words  »

July 14, 2023

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

Following our discussion series “What the Greeks Can Teach Us About AI,” I have become increasingly interested in understanding the uses and reasons for using artificial intelligence (AI). Throughout the series, participants repeated the notion that AI was simply a tool. While I believe this is true, I keep returning to the question: what is AI a tool for?

 » Read more about: A Different Sort of Tool  »

summer reading list

July 7, 2023

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

Summer recess makes me want to … read, of course! I spend hours lining up books to fill my spare time (of which there is very little actual spare time). The library is one of my favorite destinations and most of my summer reading list comes from there. (Thank goodness for public libraries!) As usual, my list is overly ambitious.

 » Read more about: Summer Reading List  »

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