Harrison Middleton University
The Raven
Gertrude Stein
astronomical clock
Rachel Carson

Category: change

We’re excited that you’ve joined the conversation! At HMU, we want to continue the great authors’ conversations in a contemporary context, and this blog will help us do that. We look back to Aristotle and the early philosophers who used reason and discourse to gain wisdom and now we endeavor to do the same every day.

CATEGORIES

May 24, 2024

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

Recently, I had the great fortune to attend a discussion series on George Eliot’s Adam Bede. Hosted by Classical Pursuits, our leader Nancy Carr guided us through four deep and insightful discussions on Eliot’s novel. I have spent some time ruminating on the ideas that I want to share with you without giving away key parts of the plot.

 » Read more about: Eliot’s Adam Bede  »

March 29, 2024

Thanks to Jennifer-NeToi Claiborne, a 2024 HMU Fellow in Ideas, for today’s post. 

When the air is warm, the smell of rain and honeysuckles fill the breeze, I know that it is summer and it is time to return to Siddhartha. I first read this book in the summer of 2000, when I was in the midst of a great change in my life. It was the summer prior to entering my freshman year of college.

 » Read more about: For Each Summer, There Is Siddhartha  »

February 2, 2024

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

Though we near the end of Bleak House, our focus remains on notions of charity. Next week will conclude our book club discussion with the eighth and final post. We have skipped much of the mystery and murder. I apologize for that, but I would hate to ruin the suspense for those who have not kept up the pace.

 » Read more about: Bleak House: The Scheming Skimpole  »

February 10, 2023

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

Before reading the ideas in this blog, I invite you to view a piece by artist M.C. Escher and listen to the “Endlessly Rising Canon” by Bach.

In his book, Gödel, Escher, Bach: An Eternal Golden Braid, Douglas Hofstadter paraphrases Kurt Gödel’s Incompleteness Theorem as follows: “All consistent axiomatic formulations of number theory include undecidable propositions.” Although this is not where January’s Quarterly Discussion started,

 » Read more about: Aristotle and Hofstadter  »

December 18, 2020

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

During this pandemicky year, a friend of mine has taken to writing me a letter every day. She usually includes details about the workday, family responsibilities, emotions of being at home, etc. A few times, she has included an old postcard, written more than a century ago, as part of the letter. These post cards have created an intense curiosity in me.

 » Read more about: Post Card Greetings  »

September 11, 2020

Thanks to Dean Coslovi, a 2020 HMU Fellow in Ideas, for today’s post.

“Among my writings my Zarathustra stands by itself. With this book I have given mankind the greatest gift it has ever been given.” – Ecce Homo, Friedrich Nietzsche.

In Thus Spoke Zarathustra, Nietzsche has his enlightened character, Zarathustra, proclaim to a town of simple villagers,

 » Read more about: Nietzsche’s Overman  »

Thanks to Dylan O’Hara, a 2020 HMU Fellow in Ideas, for today’s post.

May 22, 2020

Some of the research that has inspired me the most over the last two years or so has been Urban History. The academic crossover between History, Anthropology, Political Science, Cartography, Geography, and Environmental Studies suddenly opened up a whole new world of exploration for me. I was excited to find it was creative, expressive, expansive,

 » Read more about: A Study in Urban History  »

April 10, 2020

Thanks to Minette Bryant, a 2020 HMU Fellow in Ideas, for today’s post.

To say the least, these are unprecedented times. Certainly for the current generations—all of them!—there has not been another scenario like the one we are living out. We are making it up as we go.

As a mother and a wife, more than being concerned with how I am handling all the changes myself,

 » Read more about: Virginia Woolf in the Time of COVID-19  »

October 25, 2019

Thanks to Ned Boulberhane, a 2019 Harrison Middleton University Fellow in Ideas, for today’s post.

China: The far lands of the Orient, and perhaps the world’s oldest living civilization. However, the days of Huang He River Valley have evolved into something quite different than the previous centuries. 1949 saw the rise of communism in China, and the foundations and thinking of an individual named Mao Zedong would begin to affect the course of Chinese education,

 » Read more about: Maoist Influence on Contemporary Chinese Thought  »

August 16, 2019

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

-ess (or -esse): from ME -esse < OF < LL -issa < Greek
-Merriam-Webster Online

English borrows words from many languages. One way to identify the origin of a word is to look at the word parts. Today’s blog will outline some details about the suffix -ess (or -esse). When investigating a single morpheme,

 » Read more about: The History of -Ess  »

Scroll to Top
Skip to content