Harrison Middleton University
The Raven
Gertrude Stein
astronomical clock
Rachel Carson

Category: Communication

We’re excited that you’ve joined the conversation! At HMU, we want to continue the great authors’ conversations in a contemporary context, and this blog will help us do that. We look back to Aristotle and the early philosophers who used reason and discourse to gain wisdom and now we endeavor to do the same every day.

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September 3, 2021

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

The brutal editing process is, unfortunately, necessary. For one example, editing identifies extra language. This makes the essay flow in a tight and smooth manner which your readers will appreciate. It also highlights your main idea by removing excess jargon. Proofreading ensures that your tone, verb tenses, and language all make sense, granting a more polished tone. I suggest that you spend thirty minutes reading through your paper before you hit submit.

 » Read more about: Avoiding “Is”  »

December 18, 2020

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

During this pandemicky year, a friend of mine has taken to writing me a letter every day. She usually includes details about the workday, family responsibilities, emotions of being at home, etc. A few times, she has included an old postcard, written more than a century ago, as part of the letter. These post cards have created an intense curiosity in me.

 » Read more about: Post Card Greetings  »

December 4, 2020

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

The tricky nature of love never ceases to amaze me. George Eliot’s novel Middlemarch explores many complicated examples love. Today’s blog will focus on the relationship between Tertius Lydgate and Rosamond Vincy. Rosamond is Lydgate’s second love. Before moving to Middlemarch, he had fallen for an actress. Though we don’t know much about this experience, the narrator does tell us that he when he confessed his love to her,

 » Read more about: For the Love of Rosamond  »

December 13, 2019

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

Some people in my family say “cut on the light” when they want the light on. This drives the younger generations crazy because, of course, it sounds like the opposite of what is meant. English is a very accommodating language, however, which can privilege use over meaning. In this case, the idea of cutting on or off the lights may come from a time when a knife blade switch provided power.

 » Read more about: Cut the Lights  »

August 30, 2019

Thanks to Jennifer Taylor, a 2019 Harrison Middleton University Fellow in Ideas recipient, for today’s post.

It feels like August has only just begun, but somehow it is drawing to a close suspiciously quickly. As a new teacher, this inevitably results in mixed emotions. I – and I believe I can safely say most teachers – spend a good chunk of the summer thinking about and working on my job.

 » Read more about: The Creative Process in the Arts and Beyond  »

June 28, 2019

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

Letters often hold interest for me as a researcher and reader. They demonstrate humanity in ways that other writing cannot. People allow themselves a level of intimacy on paper that is not allowed in other areas of life. I love to write letters and I do lament that they are not as popular now as they once were. This is one of the reasons that I became interested in a collection of letters titled Velocity of Being,

 » Read more about: Dear Reader  »

January 18, 2019

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

Every Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, I enjoy rereading some of Dr. King’s remarkable works. As a culture, we are still coming to terms with his life, his death, and his very beautiful words. Personally, his words resonate with me in any number of ways. Foremost, perhaps, is the fact that he calls for honest (and perhaps painful) dialogue.

 » Read more about: From King to Rankine  »

January 11, 2019

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

“Let’s listen with our eyes and not just our ears. That would be the ideal.” –Christine Sun Kim

Early exposure to language seems to be the key in all languages. The key to what? Success in that language, or with language in general? Or in society? What is the bar for success and how is it measured?

 » Read more about: What’s Your Sign?  »

November 16, 2018

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

In Left Hand of Darkness, Ursula Le Guin has her protagonist, Genly Ai, travel to the distant planet Gethen which has no birds or flying insects. As a result, the communities there never even thought to attempt flight and their language has no word for flying. It is no wonder, then, that the people mistrust Genly who arrives by airship.

 » Read more about: Imagination in Flight  »

October 19, 2018

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

I often study the idea of Language. I am curious about how language comes to be meaningful, communicative and permanent. Yet, at the same time, language is so flexible and manipulative. This elasticity allows it to grow, change and expand to incorporate new ideas and influences. Yet, language can also restrict in unseen ways. One thing that is often forgotten,

 » Read more about: Language in the Words of Helen Keller  »

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