Harrison Middleton University
The Raven
Gertrude Stein
astronomical clock
Rachel Carson

Category: Imaginative Literature

We’re excited that you’ve joined the conversation! At HMU, we want to continue the great authors’ conversations in a contemporary context, and this blog will help us do that. We look back to Aristotle and the early philosophers who used reason and discourse to gain wisdom and now we endeavor to do the same every day.

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April 12, 2024

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

Seeing that April is National Poetry Month, and poetry is one of my lifelong loves, I wanted to spend a few moments to share my experience. From songs and music, to rhyme and meter, I love it all. But people often ask me what I get out of poetry, what it does for me. So, today’s blog is a little nod to a discipline and art form that I have wrestled with for years.

 » Read more about: The Power of Poetry  »

April 5, 2024

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

It’s an unlikely pairing, but reading Moby Dick feels a lot like taking a deep dive into a Queen album. First, you’re in gospel, then punk rock, then opera, and all of this about some seemingly mundane thing, like a bicycle. Or, in the case of Moby Dick, into the world of whaling. There are entire chapters on the shape of a whale’s head,

 » Read more about: Moby Dick and Queen  »

March 8, 2024

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

If there’s one thing you know about me by now, it’s that I value discussion. This past weekend, a number of students, staff and alumni gathered in Tempe, Arizona for a rare in-person meeting. We last met just before COVID, which caused a few years hiatus. Happily, we were finally able to renew this tradition. HMU President Joe Coulson started us off with an excellent introductory discussion about the similarities between music and poetry.

 » Read more about: Sonny’s Blues Discussion  »

February 9, 2024

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

It’s with bittersweet feelings that I write the concluding post on Bleak House. What a fun book! If you haven’t followed along with our pace, I do recommend reading, listening, or watching. There are many excellent versions. It’s filled with Dickensian wit, insight, and detail. I say Dickensian because only Dickens could write something so global in perspective while also fleshing out characters,

 » Read more about: Concluding Charity in Bleak House  »

February 2, 2024

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

Though we near the end of Bleak House, our focus remains on notions of charity. Next week will conclude our book club discussion with the eighth and final post. We have skipped much of the mystery and murder. I apologize for that, but I would hate to ruin the suspense for those who have not kept up the pace.

 » Read more about: Bleak House: The Scheming Skimpole  »

January 26, 2024

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

II have to apologize for all the material that I’m skipping in the posts on Charles Dickens’ Bleak House. Truly, one could never do it justice. It contains a world of descriptions and personalities and consequences. It’s like looking at all of humanity in a microscope. Though large, the book reads more like a play than novel.

 » Read more about: Bleak House: A Wedding  »

January 19, 2024

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

Though I am skipping over many undiscussed gems throughout Bleak House, we must move forward. The current focus on charity intertwines in various characters’ narratives in unexpected ways. Rather than exciting the expected awe or reverence, charity in this book is bandied about and thrown in the reader’s face as if a tomato at the stage.

 » Read more about: Mindset Versus Circumstance  »

January 12, 2024

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

It is impossible to continue our conversation of charity, without a brief exploration of Esther’s Narrative. Chapter 13 of Bleak House is titled “Esther’s Narrative” and is the first of eleven chapters dedicated to her story. Though it purports to be about Esther, the chapter actually begins with a discussion of Richard’s vocation. Esther, in her usual humble manner,

 » Read more about: Charity and Esther’s Narrative  »

January 5, 2024

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

Dickens’ incredible prose is a pleasure to read. The magic of fog and mud curls around the reader, until an intense cocoon settles over the whole as in a spell. Moving between Esther Summerson’s narration and the omniscient narrator helps to pull the reader in and create a sense of community with the book. I am ignorant of the slum of Tom-all-Alone’s,

 » Read more about: Telescopic Philanthropy  »

December 29, 2023

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

Charity takes center stage this time of year. In Bleak House also, charity becomes a sort of character. Even limited to the first six chapters, Dickens explores a variety of charities. The protagonist, Esther Summerson, is introduced as an orphan in the care of her godmother who is a deeply religious woman. Esther’s godmother sees nothing but sin in the young girl and therefore treats her austerely.

 » Read more about: Charity in Bleak House  »

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