Harrison Middleton University
The Raven
Gertrude Stein
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Rachel Carson

Category: Peace

We’re excited that you’ve joined the conversation! At HMU, we want to continue the great authors’ conversations in a contemporary context, and this blog will help us do that. We look back to Aristotle and the early philosophers who used reason and discourse to gain wisdom and now we endeavor to do the same every day.

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June 14, 2024

Thanks to John Wiley, a 2024 HMU Fellow in Ideas, for today’s post.

“Thy word can bring a sweet relief for ev’ry pain I feel.”[1] Anne Steele desperately clung to beliefs like this throughout her life. For Steele, her pains went well beyond the lines of poetry, as this Baptist hymn writer from the eighteenth century suffered from chronic illness combined with what appeared to be volatile mental health as well.

 » Read more about: “Dear Refuge of My Weary Soul”: Mental Health, Physical Suffering, and the Hymns of Anne Steele  »

July 16, 2021

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

Likely you are already familiar with the image of Olympics rings, the symbol of the Olympic Games. First introduced in 1913, it has become a ubiquitous representation of sports across continents. Based on a design by Pierre de Coubertin, the rings represent the five participating continents of the time. The colors exhibit at least one color from every participating nation’s flags.

 » Read more about: Olympism  »

January 29, 2021

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

“It is not easy to realize the serene joy of all the earth, when she commences to shine unobstructedly, unless you have often been abroad alone in moonlight nights.” – Henry David Thoreau

Discussions this month focused on Henry David Thoreau’s essay “Night and Moonlight” combined with Aldo Leopold’s “Land Ethic.” Both pieces propose a journey into nature,

 » Read more about: Thoreau’s Walk and Leopold’s Ethic  »

February 14, 2020

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

Natasha Trethewey’s poem “Myth,” from Native Guard, beautifully describes what it is like to seek the impossible. Trethewey wrote the poem as an expression of sorrow at the loss of her mother. Written as a palindrome, it is a perfect representation of loss because the poem cycles again and again, beginning and ending in the same place much like the endless cycle of loss.

 » Read more about: Trethewey’s “Myth”  »

August 3, 2018

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

Each quarter, Harrison Middleton University hosts a Quarterly Discussion. This discussion is open to students and non-students alike. They focus on a short text which everyone reads prior to the discussion. I thoroughly enjoy these because they give me a chance to break away from my own studies, to focus on something in a small group which is a great listening opportunity.

 » Read more about: Questions on Augustine  »

June 15, 2018

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

“A wise man always eats well.” – Chinese proverb

MFK Fisher (a friend and contemporary of Julia Child) first published How to Cook a Wolf in 1942 in the midst of World War II. The book deals with domestic stresses during war time, especially those related to food rations. The essays deal with economic purchasing and energy savings,

 » Read more about: How to Cook a Wolf  »

October 27, 2017

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

In most cases, letter writing became fashionable only after the establishment of a postal service. However, state business has been conducted via the written letter since the beginning of formal governments. Our most recent Quarterly Discussion focused on six different letters from the likes of Seneca all the way up to George H. W. Bush. We looked at Leonardo da Vinci’s job application in the form of a letter to the Duke of Milan.

 » Read more about: October Discussion Review  »

January 13, 2017

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

U2 performing MLK

 Common, “A Dream”

Martin Luther King, Jr. was one of the most vocal and prolific proponents of a path to peace through nonviolence. He fought with words and love and forgiveness, instead of fear and anger. He responded to death threats, violence and hatred with patience and understanding.

 » Read more about: King’s Speech  »

June 17, 2016

Thanks to Alissa Simon, HMU Tutor, for today’s post.

“To be, or not to be: that is the question.” – Shakespeare, Hamlet

Last week, we discussed the practice of being fully present within an actual moment, whereas today we will discover what a number of authors say about the mind’s ability to conjure presences, to bring memories into a present moment.

 » Read more about: From Thought to Presence  »

January 15, 2016

“The days of peace and slumberous calm are fled;/ Those days, all innocent of scathing war,/ When all the fair Existences of heaven/ Came open-eyed to guess what we would speak: – / That was before our brows were taught to frown,/ Before our lips knew else but solemn sounds;/ That was before we knew the winged thing,/ Victory, might not be lost, or might be won.”

 » Read more about: Peace  »

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